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new york. >> good for tina cohen. she took the dog to the vet to be scanned for a microchip and the vet tracked down the owner. she's one happy little owner. >> we're a few days until we ring in the new year. fox news is all america new year's eve starting at 11:00 p.m. eastern on new year's eve. megyn kelly and bill hemmer will bring it to you live from sometime square -- times square in new york city this coming monday. >> that's does it for us, thanks for watching. "studio b" with shepard"studio r starts now. >> the news begins anew on "studio b." the major winter storms that unleashed heavy snow and tornadoes on christmas now barreling towards the northeast. the travel delays are racking up fast. details on that ahead. the tornado threat still in effect for parts of the south after a record number of twisters rocked that region. we'll have much more on that in a moment. >>> plus, the president cutting his holiday vacation short to try to hammer out a deal on the fiscal cliff. where do we stand with six days to go? that's all ahead unless breaking news changes everything
as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, w
on the northeast. snow and sleet have produced treacherous road conditions from pennsylvania and western new york to maine with more than a foot of snow expected in some areas. this storm so far being blamed for at least six deaths. and as nbc's kurt gregory reports, the storm is creating a post holiday travel nightmare. >> reporter: cleanup on the day after christmas for the deep south. a record of more than 20 tornadoes as a massive storm system ripped through mississippi and alabama and left arkansas with a record-breaking white christmas. that storm system continued its march across the center of the nation wednesday, leaving a near whiteout from detroit -- >> not used to it. it's slick. >> reporter: -- to indianapolis. >> it's definitely a doozy out there. >> reporter: the blizzard-like conditions making getting anywhere nearly impossible, on the ground and in the skies. thousands of passengers were stranded in dallas, where temperatures stayed below freezing, forcing airlines to deice their planes. the storm has caused more than 1,300 cancellations nationwide on one of the busiest travel da
think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon i
states under winter storm warnings right now. pennsylvania, new york, massachusetts, new hampshire, vermont and maine. all could see a foot of snow or more. more than 200,000 customers spanning several states already without power. 1,700 plus flights canceled yesterday. imagine that. hundreds more already taken off the board this morning. there are six deaths being blamed on the weather since tuesday and the threat hasn't passed yesterday. bonnie schneider, meteorologist checking the system from the cnn center in atlanta. first, we go to ennis standing by in miserable, snowy new york. it's a pretty picture, ines. >> reporter: you can still see the snowfall here. and this area is expected to get anywhere from 9 to 13 inches here in syracuse and in some other areas of new york, up to 18 inches. and i'll tell you that the snowplows have been working 12-hour shifts throughout the day yesterday and evening. they were spreading salt before the storm in anticipation of the storm. this area is used to getting a lot of snowstorm. two years ago they got almost 180 inches of snowfall. and so
. and syracuse, new york, with nearly a foot of snow and counting in some areas. and that's where we begin here tonight, with abc's john schriffen leading us off. >> reporter: whiteout conditions in ohio. power poles snapped like twigs in arkansas. and this pickup truck in southern illinois, struggling just to clear a path. the winter blast, now accounting for 15 deaths. most of them on the nation's roads, where black ice led to accident after accident. >> i lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. >> reporter: today, the northeast was digging out. this man spent hours trying to rescue his car here in syracuse. what is it like dealing with this much snow? >> a lot of agony. a lot of back breaking. >> reporter: mother nature is also wreaking havoc in the skies. today alone, close to 700 flights were canceled. in the past 48 hours? nearly 3,000. on new york's long island, this southwest airlines plane skidded off the runway, getting stuck in the mud. 129 passengers evacuated safely. >> tower southwest
a conversationalist and became a striking young woman then she had her debut in new york. she came back a few years later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered wit
? >> thank you. >>> police have arrested a woman in connection with that ambush in webster, new york. remember christmas eve, two firefighters were shot and killed, two others wounded. when they arrived to put out a fire at william spangler's house. police say this woman, dawn wen, the gunman's neighbor, illegally bought those guns used in that ambush, that according to the u.s. attorney. >> the precise charge against dawn wen has to do with lying during her purchase of these two weapons. according to the publicly filed complaint, dawn wynn told the seller of these guns, ganlder mountain, located in henrietta, new york, that she was to be the true owner and buyer of the guns instead of william spangler. it is absolutely against federal law to provide any materially false information relating to the acquisition of firearms. >> the assault rifle and the shotgun that were found with spangler, he committed suicide. >>> this, meanwhile, is the sketch of a suspect in thursday's subway killing in new york city. the woman is said to be heavy set and in her 20s. witnesses say that she pushed
. new york, new jersey, and portions of pennsylvania. the author recalls the importance of the region during the war and visits several sites to document their historical significance and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends
. >> this will be the last one. [inaudible] new york city i'm actually very happy about the discharge petition. it's already exceed my expectations in the speed of which our members being here only a limited amount of time this week were able to snand line and stand the petition. the fact is that it's about getting people to sign. it's also about bringing pressure on the leadership to say why are you not bringing this to the floor. is this a forever protection of the wealthiest people in our country at the expense of the middle class. this decoupling is strat to solving our fiscal challenge that we have now. don't you wonder yourself why the american people almost 100%, i've never seen a poll that says 100%,over whemingly support. this democrats and republicans support. the senate passed it, the president is poised to sign it. why would they block that except to protect the high end? >> we'll take one more. >> [inaudible] did you have any concern about increased debt over to the executive branch. >> my understanding is they are talking about the mcconnell rule which is the president would send his proposal
, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional interest but the national interest. we have the highest concentration of population, the most sophisticated delivery system and interconnection, we have light rail, subway, metro, connectors all up and down the corridor so that high-speed rail is not something that will run by itself as opposed to last week where we heard about the major red ministrations effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on whic
, according to the waterfront commission, about a third of the new york workers make north of $210,000 a year without is special bonuses that come on later. 34 made north of $350,000 a year last year and they're worried about being replaced by machinery and -- for the most expensive port in the world. >> eric: thank you to brett. thank you, sir. >> thank you. >>> is this port strike happen, should unions face a backlash? we contacted the international longshoreman's association again, still no word. we tried it yesterday. we have 64,000 longshoreman to may hold up 50 or 60% of the nation's import and export trade. >> it's worse. when you throw in another looming fiscal calamity. you're damaging the economy at the time it's already suffering damage. >> is what the unions do? think about what we've experienced the last year. l.a. airport strike happening on the busiest travel day of the year. a chicago teacher strike when kids were going back to school and wal-mart trying when christmas was hitting. unions hitting you see us when we're vulnerable. >> they're exercising maximum leverage at the p
weeks. this is "early today" on nbc. >>> welcome back. stories making news this morning. "the new york times" reports that the u.s. secretly gave its blessing to armed shipments to rebel groups in libya during the fight against moammar gadhafi, but officials became alarmed that some of the weapons sent from qatar may have been turned over to islamic militants. >>> a new congressional report shows waistful spending of tax money that was intended for counter terrorism purposes. some of the most head shaking examples include the homeland security security department paid for a hog catcher? texas, a fish tank in a small texas town, and an underwater robot in a midwest city with no major rivers or lakes nearby. >>> john mcafee, the eccentric software tycoon, was arrested in guatemala. he has been a fugitive from police in belize after the murder of his neighbor. >>> in philippines the death toll has increased to 350 and almost 400 people are missing so that number will go even higher. >>> and in new york city, a homeless man is facing charges of second degree murder in the death of a man wh
's in january 1860, shortly after homer had moved to new york city. in new york, homer took a few lessons in painting from frederic rondel. rondel was a rather sentimental landscape painter who had little influence on homer's style beyond his technical instruction in the use of oils. when the civil war began, harper's commissioned the artist to depict life at the front. rovi behind the lines with the potomac army, homer produced a series of closelybserved studies of camp life. homer's paintings of this period have an anecdotal or literary quality in keeping with the traditions of magazine illustration, but he also places new emphasis on pictorial design and the purely visual character of a scene-- qualities typical of the photographs of mathew brady and others. like the photographers of the civil war, whose equipment made action scenes impossible, homer preferred static group formations, and yet the feeling of directness in recording the ordinary lends to his work a special force. prisoners from the front, with its profound sense of the resignation, exhaustion, and human cost of war, evok
new york newspaper chooses to publish the names and addresses of thousands of private citizens who have legal gun permits. can the mainstream media still claim not to hate all gun owners after a stunt like this? "the kudlow report" starts right now. let's get the latest on the snag on the fiscal cliff talks and surprise news we are going to reach the debt ceiling in days instead of just a few months. john harwood has the details. what's going on? >> not a whole lot of actions going on. although there have been some developments. let me bring our viewers up to date on those. first of all, treasury secretary geithner this afternoon announced the united states would hit the statutory debt limit on monday. that's new year's eve. that's part of an effort to pressure congress to act to raise the debt limit which may or may not be direct limb reply indicated in the fiscal cliff talks but it is relevant to the larger issue of debt and deficits. the treasury can move money around in certain ways to extend the point where we actually reach a crisis for probably a couple of months. but this i
will be here. also, "new york times" columnist frank bruni and nbc white house correspondent, chuck todd. also, the lives they live. this sunday's "new york times" magazine profiles the memorable people and in some cases places that we lost in 2012. john kelly joins us for a look back at those who passed. >>> up next, mike allen with the "politico playbook." first is dylan drier tracking the winter storm. >> this storm is a big one. it affected the whole eastern third of the country for several days right through that all-important holiday for travelers. that certainly did wreak havoc on the airports. we ended up with more than a foot of snow in some areas, especially back into ohio, pennsylvania and new york state. granby, connecticut, picked up six inches before it changed over to rain. we saw winds gusting up near hurricane-force strength in brick, new jersey. 74-mile-per-hour wind gusts. most of the eastern seaboard did see gusts in excess of 50 miles per hour. this storm is still lingering across northern new england where winter storm warnings and advisories are still in effect. heaviest
will be announced today in colorado, connecticut, massachusetts, new york, and tennessee. 20,000 students at those select schools will spend an extra 300 hours per term in class starting next year. it will be up to local districts to decide if school days or school years should be extenzed. >>> very interesting approach there. >>> and a church in boston could soon be seeing a huge influx of cash, but not everyone in the congregation is happy about it. that's the result of a vote that took place yesterday at the old south church in boston's historic back bay. >>> and then members voted to sell one of the church's two copies of the book, first book published in north america. could be sold for, get this, up to $25 million. >> wow. the money will be used for outreach projects and renovations. but some members say the church is selling off hiftd. but they're going to do a lot of good with the $25 million if they do, indeed, garner it. >> i would hope $25 million would do some good. >> outreach. renovations. >> good. hopefully good in the community as well. and all that good stuff. we'll see what they
from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 6379. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized, and without objection. mr. farenthold: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 6379, introduced by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. clyburn, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 6239 savannah highway in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. this bill was introduced on september 12. mr. speaker, mr. inabinett is a longstanding and faithful citizen of south carolina. he was born there in 1931 and attended grade school, college and graduate school in the state. later, he taught at baptist high school in charleston county and was appointed to the charleston county election commission. he became the medicare of ravenel, south carolina, and joined the s
christmas in new york 73 unless you are manger square in bethlehem. >> clayton: we'll tell you about people stuck on the tarmac. five or six hours. if you were trapped or stuck in texas let us know. >> we have a folks news - fox news alert. former president bush's condition has worsened. he is 88 years old and he was formerally the president . he was hospitalized for a cough . and family spokesman admits things are not going well but doctors remain cautiously optmistic. >> he's in critical condition and in a bad way. the doctors believe there is a path for him to recover from this and if we can get him to rally a bit we will talk about a discharge date. >> he is alert and joking with the staff at methodist hospital. we'll have a live report from houston in the bottom of the hour. stay tuned for that . dozens of people singing "amazing grace" last night as they remember the two firefighters murded in webster, new york. ♪ i once was lost, but now i am found. >> the community coming together to honor these two men. they were shot and killed in an excon's christmas eve bash. we are hearing fr
and that is what he was searching for. many classmates call him barry and when he got to new york, those four years in new york city people call him barry and some call him barack. >> host: why did he choose occidental and why transfer to colombia? >> guest: he of people who were going there and the way he tells the story, there was a girly in honolulu who was in that area so he got that -- it was like the next step. it was comfortable, beautiful, small, elite, california sunshine, very comfortable. it was an important two years. restarted to expand intellectually. he got his first sense of destiny in those two years but left because it was too -- he wanted to experience the world and was finding himself. taken to los angeles, to new york and chicago but it is important to get to new york first. he starts his junior year. >> host: his first night in new york city. >> i was a little dubious but turns out to be true. he was not that spending night in that apartment would be better, but he couldn't get in. he couldn't get the keys and couldn't find the landlord, a friend of a friend of his mother, he
it in new york and san francisco and seattle and chicago, all of these places, in the london and paris. we see the try um of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% urbanized, the more urbanized countries have on average income levels that are five times higher and infant mortality levels that are less than a third. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. but with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which is too often remaining mired in the unending rural poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almostal of its -- almost all of it existence. it is mumbai, it is delhi, that are the pathways out of po
ago. this is from the front page of today's "new york daily news." finally, from the front page is this report about what is ahead in terms of the gun control fight. we heard from the nra friday. let me read you a few sentences -- that was nearly 20 years ago in 1993. we will hear from that testimony in a couple of minutes. we want to get your calls and what is ahead in gun-control. roy is joining us from north carolina, the independent line, good morning. caller: it could be a bitter fight but i think some drastic action needs to be taken. it should be at least as burdensome for the gun owner as it is for a car owner. registration, insurance, testing, everything -- handguns are a big problem, too. i think it is so bad that the president should do some kind of executive order and put a moratorium on military rifles, at least, because around here in western north carolina, there are gun shops and people waiting for four hours to get to this ar-15. they say they will not take it out of the box, the majority of them. they will either have it as an investment or have it grandfathere
that in the people who are speaking out and those who are not, there's a shift in attitudes, as the "new york times" puts in their headline today, i think will be lasting. i don't know how any -- there are several networks, not just ours, having trouble finding pro gun advocates to speak out because there's really nothing to say at this point. can you think of anything in your political career, where something has happened and you realize you just can't take -- >> 9/11. 9/11 happened and there were a lot of conservatives after 9/11 very wary, very suspicious of federal government expansion, expansion of powers. and i'm one of them. that afterwards, you're like, okay, if the tsa wants to be intrusive, let the tsa be intrusive. if we have to do things that make me uncomfortable, as a small government conservative. fine. this is really, this is a domestic version of 9/11, where everything changed. >> everything did change. one thing joe manchin said yesterday, after he talked about his transformation and the way he thinks about guns and gun rights, was that the president needs to move quickly on this
plaido eer madoff s didn't know about the fraud until his brother told him. a new judge in new york said she had a hard time believing that. >>> and call this an indication of the reduced influence of the 220-year-old new york stock exchange. it's being bought by a company that's just 12 years old. no major changes are expected after atlanta based intercontinental exchange completes its $8 billion purchase. that should happen sometime next year. >> wow. >> $8 billion. >> to purchase the new york stock exchange. that's fascinating. what that could potentially mean should be interesting. but we'll see how it plays out, as always. >>> facebook will soon be racking up more revenue $1 at a time. the social network is testing out a new service on a limited number of people for $1, and will guarantee delivery of a message into the main inbox of someone who they are not friends with. currently, some of you may know messages from nonfriends most likely end up in a much ignored folder labeled other. the company says the fee should help discourage spammers. let's hope so. i never knew that box exis
of what over people may do when they hit puddles or something. >> reporter: in syracuse, new york, plows are working overtime. this car stuck with no place to go. >> the weather was bad. the winds were bad. blowing the cars around. you could see the semis were swerving. >> reporter: it's the city's first snowstorm of the season. many are bracing for more to come. john schriffen, abc news, new york. >> all right, thanks, john. >>> one area of severe weather to keep an eye on. accuweather meteorologist andrew baglini has the latest. >> we're tracking a disturbance that will give us bad weather. eastern texas around the houston area, thunderstorms will pop up. that spreads eastward throughout christmas tuesday. interstates 10 and 20, large hail, damaging wind gusts, the threat for tornado. a destructive storm system on this tuesday. the highest threat for tornadoes around new orleans, mobile, interstate 10 northward into the panhandle of florida. good snow across portions of the plains. >> i hate to see rough weather this time of the year. >>> let's look at weather from across the country.
's not a lot of optimism that it can be cone in time. jonathan karl, abc news, new york. >>> tributes are pouring in for retired general norman schwartzcopf. the general, nicknamed stormin' norman, died yesterday in tampa from pneumonia. he commanded a coalition of some 30 countries that drove iraqi forces from kuwait back in 1991. in retirement, he supported charitable causes and resisting calls to rub for public office. norman schwartzcopf was 78. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been pushed to his death in the path of a new york subway train. last night, a woman shoved the man on the tracks just as the train was pulling into the station on queens. it's not clear if she knew the victim. new york police are reviewing surveillance video recorded on the platform to try to identify the victim and the suspect. >> this is the second time this happened this month. the first one happened in times square. this one happened in queens. i love the fact that new york city has a subway system. but every time i'm putting my back against the wall. >> you're not the only one. there are
used to sell patricia cornwell. each unto itself. it begs the question when we put an ad in "new york times" come it's not like putting an advertisement for a honda or a cadillac. it is one book. it is not random house advertising on its books. it's one book. it's a very different and very subjective business, which means that you can only fit so much when it comes to marrying books to readers, books for which publishers pay a deal for. when i was at schuster, they paid $8 million, which had been a record number for ronald reagan's memoir, called american life. you know, the math as well as i do. you need to sell 4 million books. not just write a million dollars, you need to sell 250,000. the book actually sold about 300,000 copies. so it was a spectacular failure. because of the comparison. it's a highly complex business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. yo
will see is it will mix in with another storm. new york city, southern connecticut, and south of boston going to get the biggest snow totals. let me show you what you can expect in the way of snow totals. the pink area is two to five inches, broad brush across parts of pennsylvania. upstate new york, you'll see a little bit more. see that maroon spot south of boston? that's where we get the five to ten-inch area. near a foot south of boston locally. it's going to be an interesting one. here at the airports, boston and new york included, in heavy delays today. and you have moderate delays back here. detroit, chicago, some cold and some wind going to affect them. los angeles will have rain. so, it doesn't just stop on the east coast. we have travel trouble in other places. but on the roads, anywhere in the pacific northwest could be a little slippery. and certainly, with this storm, again, from ohio all the way to maine. back to bianna. >> a travel nightmare for so many people. ginger, thank you. >>> we're going to turn to the desperate, last-ditch effort to try to keep the country from f
or something. >> reporter: across the country in syracuse, new york, plows are working overtime, dealing with two consecutive days of snow this weekend, leave thing car stuck with no place to go. >> the weather was bad. the winds were blowing the cars around. you could see the semis were swerving. >> reporter: it's the city's first snowstorm of the season. many are bracing for more to come. >> if you wanted a white christmas, there you go. >>> the gulf coast is even bracing for the worst. >> including some christmas week tornadoes, believe it or not. andrew has the latest now from accuweather. >> while most of the nation will be relatively tranquil for the holidays, we're tracking one disturbance that will give us unsettled weather across portions of the gulf coast. late tonight, the houston area, we'll see thunderstorms popping up, spreading eastward throughout your christmas tuesday. louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia, interstates 10 and 20, torrential downpours, the threat for tornadoes. so a very destructive storm system on this saturday. the highest threat for tornadoes we are
times. he's a celebrity because of the debate with douglas. and the speech in new york. at the end of the date purpose was to win the election. he didn't win the election. a speech he gave in new york. we can remember president obama's speech in 2004. the democratic national convention the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure. four years later was about the speech he's not a pauseble candidate for the presidency. he gives a dazzling speech in new york. when he ran for the senate when president obama gave the speech in 2004 he was running for the senate in senate in jill. illinois he lost. think about president obama run for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election. in illinois lincoln is from illinois. the land of lincoln. huge hometown advantage for him. the reason they put it in chicago by one vote, by the way, think voted to put in chicago by one vote. could have been one vote hasn't concerned it. once it's -- in they weren't worried about the home court advantage. it wasn't a player. right. >> they were lists published by maj
, let me quote "the new york times." i have a positive feeling now. this is senator kay bailey hutchison, republican of texas who said a burst of a deal talk broke out as soon as they left the capitol. harry reid was sounding the death knell. what happened yesterday, david? >> congressional leaders came to the white house and had direct talks with the president and john boehner continues to say, look, new it's up to the senate to take action and so there is -- what was noticed on these negotiations and the question is go going, and that's the sticking point and we're waiting to see what happens and we're running out of time and as the other guests have said, it will be up to the house to see if they can get it through. >> i want to throw it up on the screen so folks at home can appreciate when we're talking about and what it will mean for people if no deal is reached. the bush tax cuts expire for all americans. that means everyone's taxes go up. the payroll tax holiday will expire which means roughly $1,000 decrease in take home pay for the the average worker. unemployment insurance goes
in the weather center this morning for rick reichmuth. quite a doozie of a storm in new york. >> i wouldn't go that far. not that huge of a deal across the northeast. many people used to dealing with the snowfall. the big deal with the storm is that we just got hit with one about a day ago and now having to deal with more snowfall here. some places picked up 20 inches of snow on thursday and with that snow storm that produced even some tornadoes across parts of the south and yet again dealing with more snow here in many of those areas. parts of illinois picked up a foot with that last system now looking at more snowfall from the storm. the worse of it winding down in indiana. basically on the warm side of the system we have showers and thunderstorms. areas of heavy rain across northern florldz and eastern carolinas that should be moving out very shortly. you will be drying out. head northbound temperatures are cold enough. ohio have you been dealing with that snowfall throughout the entire overnight hours. pennsylvania and upstate, new york already seeing that snowfall moving on in. as far as
, new york. >> he was known for being opinionated and brave, the kind of guy you want on your side. >> there's no question, when you think about the first persian gulf war, that was the defining war for millions of americans because there had been a break, and then america went back to war. he became a household name. >> stormin' norman is hard to forget. that's a great nickname. >> we can all remember turning on the tv and seeing the bombs dropping saying okay, it's for real now. he was the person who led america right through all that. >> going to be missed. >>> in other news, with just four days to go, president obama and the top lawmakers meet today at the white house on the fiscal cliff. any compromise is expected to include an extension of the middle class tax cuts with increased rates at upper incomes. spending cuts could also be canceled. ahead of those talks, plenty of blame is being spread around already. >> john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on firm financial footing. >> hopefully there's time for an agreement of some ki
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
. >>> in new york, subway riders, and there are hundreds of thousands of them, getting word the person who pushed -- who was pushed on to the tracks in front of a train this week may have been the victim of a hate crime. police say the woman they arrested for the fatal push has confessed. prosecutors have now charged her with murder as a hate crime. they released surveillance video showing a possible suspect running from the scene. police found that person after a passerby on the street noticed she looked like the woman in the video. authorities saying the suspect told them she hates hindus and muslims, although it is not clear if the victim was either one of those. witnesses say the attacker was muttering to herself on thursday night before approaching the man and shoving him off the platform in front of a speeding subway train to his death. ?ai a passenger plane slid off the runway and exploded into flames. people died at the scene. what we are learning now about how this happened in minutes. and reports the first official lawsuit in the wake of the masacre at sandy hook elementary. and
reprint extracts from that addition in their home, often under dateline. see here is new york six are also a boston gazette issue from 1766. so here the deadline tells me this news came from new york and quit akeley new york newspaper. after action reports are also at primary source of news funds the work begins. so after action reports or when the commanding a third right a summary of the events of the military engagement and send them up the chain. often in america the president of congress. he would share that report with the local newspaper printer. then dad newspaper the sun that and you receive the report appeared in newspapers up and down the colonies. so we are we have 1777 issue of the continental journal. this includes george washington's own account of the battle of trenton and crossing of the delaware. you can see at the top the dateline baltimore. as for congress is meeting at the time. i said earlier that she really don't see a lot of headlines in the 18th century newspapers. mostly defines an excerpt of a letter from. here is the april 21st 1775 issue of the new hampshire ga
>> great to be back. christmas in new york. this is fantastic. >> you love this, even as a west coast girl, you love being in the big apple. >> put on my scarf and mittens and went for a walk. sometimes it's 70s in l.a. it's not christmas. >> that sounds like heaven to me. perfect to me. >> welcome aboard. shift number two for you. you're here with us all week. >> all week long. paula faris is on assignment. that's why i'm filling in today. >> check paula out on "good morning america." >>> coming up today, hear who's adding their voices to the gun control debate. our top story and you're going to see who is also sending a little christmas comfort to the children of newtown, connecticut. they're facing so many hardships of their own. >> it does not feel like christmas at all in that town. so whatever comforts that town right now. also this morning, a rather dire prediction about the fiscal cliff and what might happen when lawmakers return later this week. it's a pocketbook issue for all of us. >> some people are expecting to maybe go right over that cliff. >> more likely than a c
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